Posted tagged ‘Fannie Mae’

Ron Paul: Important News on Audit the Fed

October 31, 2009

Mel Watt – Fed shill, enemy of truth.

bernakewattcopy-1

http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=114624

Further investigation through OpenSecrets.org reveals that the largest share of Watt’s campaign contributions in the 2008 election cycle came from the finance, insurance and real estate industries.


Breakdown of industries supporting Rep. Mel Watt’s 2008 campaign (graph from OpenSecrets.org)

In fact, of $609,072 given to Watt, $217,109 – or 35.6 percent – came from the money sector, including over $187,000 – or nearly 31 percent of his total contributions – from political action committees within the finance, insurance and real estate industry. The next highest industry supporting Watt was labor, which contributed only 14 percent of his total war chest.

Furthermore, the four largest contributors to Watt’s cause were Bank of America, Wachovia Corp., American Express and the American Bankers Association.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mel_Watt

Opposition to increased oversight of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
In 2003 Watt vehemently opposed efforts by the George W. Bush administration and Congressional Republicans to increase regulatory oversight of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.[7] “I don’t see much other than a shell game going on here, moving something from one agency to another and in the process weakening the bargaining power of poorer families and their ability to get affordable housing”, Mr. Watt said.[7] Watt said that “Brad Miller and I were at the forefront of that more than anybody else in America” in trying to prevent the financial crisis, despite the fact that Watt’s stated position was against an increase and more oversight for high risk lending.[8]

March Economic Picture

April 4, 2009

Let’s start with the good (?) news.

Stock Market

The stock market rallied at the end of March. The Dow had its worst January ever and worst February since the Depression, then, in March, turned in its best month in six years.

On March 23, 2009, Joe Weisenthal at Clusterstock wrote:

On the day when Geithner first announced the non-details of his bank plan, the stock market began a hard tumble.

Today, as the government confirms that taxpayer money will be used to replenish bank coffers and help hedge funds make huge profits, stocks are soaring.

Continue reading…

Naturally, some “experts” like Doug Kass and Jim Cramer were quick to call the bottom.  But let’s see where we really are.

four-bears-large1

Judging by dshort.com‘s “Four Bad Bears” chart, it looks like the bottom callers are being a bit hasty. They just may end up on a modern version of the “1927 – 1933 Chart of Pompous Prognosticators“, especially considering that Nouriel Roubini is still predicting an L-shaped recovery.

Banking

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency reported in March that banks lost $9.2 billion in derivatives trading losses in the 4th quarter.

Citigroup saw its shares drop below $1.00 and hover there for much of March.

Five banks were added to the FDIC ‘s failed bank list.

But good news (for banksters anyway) came from the Financial Accounting Standards Board when it relaxed the “mark to market” rule for bank assets on April 2. With banks no longer required to value assets based on reality, April at least will probably be a good month for banks.

Retail

retailyoyfeb2009

February Retail Sales Chart from Calculated Risk

Retailers reported continued sales declines in February, though not quite as steep as those seen in January.

Call me a doom-and-gloomer, but I suspect most sales increases seen in February and perhaps March (we should see those numbers soon) are due primarily to people getting – and spending – tax refunds. Let’s wait and see what the reports look like later this spring before we get too optimistic.

Wal-Mart, on the other hand, showed February growth of approximately 5% (about twice what was expected). Wal-Mart is doing so well, that on March 19, it announced $2 billion in bonuses to be given to hourly employees:

Wal-Mart Stores Inc is awarding approximately $2 billion to its U.S. hourly employees through financial incentives, including handing out $933.6 million in bonuses on Thursday, after the world’s largest retailer gained market share amid a recession.

In a memo distributed to Wal-Mart employees and obtained by Reuters, Wal-Mart CEO Mike Duke said the retailer is awarding roughly $2 billion to U.S. hourly employees, which includes $933.6 million in bonuses, $788.8 million in profit sharing and 401(k) contributions, millions of dollars in merchandise discounts, and contributions to its employee stock purchase plan.

Continue reading…

And now the not so good news.

Unemployment

Unemployment Claims Chart from Calculated Risk

Unemployment Claims Chart from Calculated Risk

697,000 jobs were cut in February and 742,000 were cut in March. The total number of people claiming unemployment benefits is currently about 5.56 million – the highest number since May 1983.

Broader measures showed the February unemployment rate at 14.8%, or 1 out of 7 Americans unemployed. This figure includes the “discouraged” job seekers and those working part-time jobs who want full-time work.

Unemployment rates rose in all US metro areas in February, with 7 states reporting rates at or above 10%.

Recent photo taken in San Diego. Click for source.

Recent photo taken in San Diego. Click for source.

I keep hearing that unemployment is a “lagging indicator” of the overall economy. Maybe I didn’t get enough government sponsored education, but it seems to me that a real recovery can’t happen until people are working again, earning money they can then spend. When the unemployment rate starts dropping instead of increasing by such huge amounts every month, that is when I’ll start to believe the recovery has begun.

Housing and Personal Finance

With so many unemployed, you know there is nothing good happening in housing and personal finance.

Case Shiller House Prices for January Chart from Calculated Risk

Case Shiller House Prices for January Chart from Calculated Risk

Home prices are still falling.  “The national peak-to-trough decline is now 27%, and it will likely exceed 40% before we hit bottom.  If there’s any good news here, it’s that the rate of decline appears to be stabilizing.

While this is certainly bad news for individual homeowners, it’s actually good news for the economy in general. It is evidence that in spite of all the doomed efforts being made by the government and the Fed to reinflate the bubble, the market is doing its job and the necessary correction is proceeding quite well.

The January drop in home prices is record setting, however, and it does contribute to severe financial problems for individuals. A study released early in March showed one in five US mortgages to be underwater.

Another report said 12% of all mortgages (one in nine) are now delinquent or in some stage of foreclosure. In fact, the rate of foreclosures in February rose 30% over the previous year.

On March 31, an FHA spokesman said FHA loans were “seriously delinquent” at the end of February.

Not surprisingly, foreclosures are especially rising in California.

February New Home Sales Chart from Calculated Risk

February New Home Sales Chart from Calculated Risk

The February new home sales report showed a 4.7% increase, leading many to believe the bottom was in for housing. Not likely, though, since even with the increase the numbers are the lowest sales for February since the Census Bureau started tracking sales in 1963.

Existing home sales also increased slightly in February, though nearly half of those sales were buyers taking advantage of extreme savings on forclosed properties. Many of these buyers, apparently, are foreign investors.

According to a Labor Department report, consumer prices rose 0.4% in February.

The Administrative Office of the US Courts reported bankruptcy filing were up 31% in 2008.

Early in March it was reported that food stamp enrollment had climbed to a record 31.8 million people.

All of which leads to the unsurprising news that consumer confidence is still at nearly record lows and personal savings increased to 5%.

US Auto Industry

The US Auto Industry was all over the headlines again in late March, beginning with a $5 billion bailout for auto suppliers and reports of steep drops in auto sales – 37% in March.

But the biggest headlines appeared when the Obama administration, operating in a weird double standard, forced GM CEO Rick Wagoner to step down – a move that sent GM stocks freefalling to a 74-year low.

GM’s new CEO, Fritz Henderson (former head of GMAC mortgage finance), is apparently more open to the possibility of bankruptcy than Wagoner was.

The Obama administration now plans to take a key role in “reshaping” GM’s board of directors, though Obama also said he has “no intention” of running GM. Good thing, too, since the administration’s  “plan” for the auto industry is pretty lightweight.

A great many comments posted to online articles about the big news at GM boiled down to “if they’re taking government money, the government can do whatever it wants”. Right or wrong, such thinking only highlights the moral hazard of government bailouts of private industry in the first place.

Shortly after the government’s de facto takeover of GM, Ford announced that it would cover car payments for buyers who lose their jobs. GM quickly followed with a similar program.

The Obama administration also announced that the government will guarantee all GM car warrantees (but remember, they’re not running the company). Auto shops run by the DMV maybe? Sounds great!

One last related bit of auto news caught my attention in March. It seems that an increasing number of desperate people, unable to continue making their auto loan payments, are instead setting their vehicles on fire to collect the insurance money.

Federal Government Spending

Early in March, President Obama signed the pork-laden $410 billion government spending bill.

The US Deficit in Global Perspective

The US Deficit in Global Perspective

Also early in March, the national debt hit a record $11 trillion, or about $36,000 for every man, woman and child in America. In the fastest increase of debt in American history, in Barack Obama’s first 50 days as president the Congress voted to spend $1.2 trillion, or “$1 billion an hour”, according to Senator Mitch McConnell.

 

 

In an exclusive interview with the NY Times, Mr. Obama floated the idea of another $750 billion to be given to banks, even though the amount already spent on “financial rescue” is nearly equal to GDP – in other words, the same amount as the value of everything the US produced last year.

All of this was enough to make China worry that the US might not be able to repay its debts. Of course, our dear leader reassured the Chinese that we’re still good for it (even if it means we have to inflate our currency to the moon and back).

Big news was also made in March by AIG and its $218 million executive bonus payments. Taxpayers were outraged (sort of) and Congress moved quickly to pass a 90% tax on “TARP bonuses”.

Signing a retroactive tax would have been a political disaster for the Obama administration, plagued with questions of the “who knew what and when did they know it” variety. Luckily for Obama, New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo managed to get the AIG executives to return the money before the 90% tax bill landed on his desk. Instead, the administration will look to limit pay at all businesses receiving government money.

If government is going to dictate employee pay, they need to start with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Freddie asked for another $30.8 billion after losing over $50 billion in 2008. Freddie’s $24 billion Q4 loss breaks down to $3000 per second lost yet Fannie and Freddie plan to pay more than $210 million in employee retention bonuses over the coming year.

And we want to retain these employees, why?

The “Newspaper Revitalization Act” was introduced in the Senate during the last week of March. The mainstream media bailout would rewrite tax law to allow newspapers to operate as tax-exempt nonprofit organizations, just as long as they don’t make official endorsements of political candidates. Critics say such a bailout would lead to government control of the news.

That would be different, how?

Also, the US Postal Service is going broke (again).

President Obama’s proposed budget was the main topic of a prime-time news conference in March. Fact checking afterwards showed the enormity of this president’s doublespeak capabilities.

Senator Judd Gregg, who turned down the nomination for Commerce Secretary, said “we’ll go bankrupt under Obama’s budget“. Sounds about right.

Obama Deficit in Pictures

Obama Deficit in Pictures

 

The Federal Reserve

With demand for US Treasurys declining, the Fed launched a “bold” plan to dump another $1 trillion into the US economy.

The Financial Times Alphaville blog posted some early reactions including one from Yves Smith of Naked Capitalism calling the Fed’s move “shock and awe” and comparing it to when that phrase was used at the start of the Iraq war.

Following the Fed’s “shock and awe” announcement, Treasurys continued to decline and the dollar fell dramatically against other currencies. It seems that more than a few analysts are certain the Fed’s plan has killed the dollar.

China and Russia are also skeptical, it seems. They are calling ever more loudly for a new reserve currency.

US Treasury

Tim “Tax Cheat” – “Markets won’t solve the crisis” Geithner (finally) announced his plan to resolve make taxpayers pay for banks’ toxic assets.

For a very limited amount of risk, private investors will “partner” with taxpayers to pay over-market-value for banks’ toxic assets, thus re-creating solvency for the banks. If it later turns out the assets really weren’t worth much, the private investors loses only their small (7%) investment in the deal. The taxpayers will be left holding the bag for the rest.

Even if the private investors make money on any of the deals, the taxpayers are still likely to get fleeced.

Here’s a more detailed explanation: Message from Cumberland Advisors.

Even though the Treasury said they don’t know if this plan will work, the stock market was overjoyed with it, closing up nearly 4% and kicking off the recent rally.

Geithner’s plan has been widely criticized by some heavy economic hitters including James Galbraith, Nassim  Taleb, and Nobel laureates Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz.

And isn’t this plan really just a slightly modified version of the original Paulson-Bernanke plan from September – the one Paulson ended up scrapping, saying it couldn’t possibly work? Yes, actually, that’s just what it is.

Oh, by the way, the NewSpeak term for toxic assets is now “legacy assets“. After all, the only reason nobody wants these things is because we keep calling them “toxic”, right? It has nothing to do with the fact that they are piles of paper representing nearly worthless, defaulted loans. Right?

Last Words

The Quiet Coup by Simon Johnson in The Atlantic Magazine is highly recommended. Synopsis:

“The crash has laid bare many unpleasant truths about the United States. One of the most alarming, says a former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund, is that the finance industry has effectively captured our government—a state of affairs that more typically describes emerging markets, and is at the center of many emerging-market crises. If the IMF’s staff could speak freely about the U.S., it would tell us what it tells all countries in this situation: recovery will fail unless we break the financial oligarchy that is blocking essential reform. And if we are to prevent a true depression, we’re running out of time.”

And finally, if you have not yet seen Daniel Hannan’s heroic March 26, 2009 speech in the EU in which he calls British PM Gordon Brown (to his face) “the devalued Prime Minister of a devalued government”, click below and enjoy.

Mr. Hannan’s words could should be repeated to the governments and central bankers of every nation.

Fannie’s Smoking Gun

March 3, 2009

From The LRC Blog:

Fannie’s Smoking Gun

Posted by Bill Anderson at March 2, 2009 02:39 PM

It seems that the editors of the New York Times and Paul Krugman are practicing selective amnesia again. You might recall that they have been adamant in their insistent that Fannie and Freddie were not the cause of any difficulties in the markets, and it was all due to the lack of regulation of private markets.

Rob Blackstock has sent me a copy of an article from the September 30, 1999, New York Times in which Fannie began to ease credit:

In a move that could help increase home ownership rates among minorities and low-income consumers, the Fannie Mae Corporation is easing the credit requirements on loans that it will purchase from banks and other lenders.The action, which will begin as a pilot program involving 24 banks in 15 markets — including the New York metropolitan region — will encourage those banks to extend home mortgages to individuals whose credit is generally not good enough to qualify for conventional loans. Fannie Mae officials say they hope to make it a nationwide program by next spring.

Fannie Mae, the nation’s biggest underwriter of home mortgages, has been under increasing pressure from the Clinton Administration to expand mortgage loans among low and moderate income people and felt pressure from stock holders to maintain its phenomenal growth in profits. (emphasis mine)

 In addition, banks, thrift institutions and mortgage companies have been pressing Fannie Mae to help them make more loans to so-called subprime borrowers. These borrowers whose incomes, credit ratings and savings are not good enough to qualify for conventional loans, can only get loans from finance companies that charge much higher interest rates — anywhere from three to four percentage points higher than conventional loans.

Continue reading

And for your listening enjoyment, “Take a Load Off Fannie” by The Band

February Economic Picture

March 1, 2009

Lots of economic news in February 2009, so let’s look at it in several categories.

Federal Government

News about federal government spending came at a head-spinning pace in February, with enough twists and turns to satisfy the most intense rollercoaster fans.

Feb 17: Obama signs $787 billion stimulus bill

Feb 18: Some GOP Governors Consider Refusing Stimulus Money

Feb 19: Obama announces Housing Bailout at $275 Billion

Feb 19: CNBC’s Rick Santelli wants to have a tea party

Feb 23: Obama convenes a “Fiscal Responsibility Summit”, says it’s time to clamp down on federal expenditures

Feb 24: Obama addresses joint session of Congress, says he intends to cut deficits in half over the next four years

Feb 25: House OKs $410B spending

Feb 26: Obama unveils his first budget –  $1.75 trillion deficit for the 2009 fiscal year

There are problems with Obama’s budget – for one, it depends on revenue by 2012 from carbon emission trading, a program that does not yet exist.

It also expects 3.2% growth in GDP next year, an enormous increase given the most recent figures of a 6.2 percent decline in the last quarter of 2008.

And Obama’s plan to raisetaxes on the wealthiest 2% of taxpayers to pay for his expensive domestic agenda is more wishful thinking. According to this Wall Street Journal editorial, he could take everything they earn, and it still won’t be enough.

Obama’s budget: huge ambitions, huge obstacles.

The Fed

 Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke testified before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on February 24, 2009.

He was asked by Senator Evan Bayh what he thought about the anger brewing among people who feel the federal government’s “housing rescue plan” is unfair.

Bernanke responded with the “your neighbor’s house is burning but it’s his fault” analogy. “You could punish him by refusing to send the fire dept and then he would learn his lesson, but unfortunately in the process you’d have the entire neighborhood burning down,” said Bernanke.

Read more…

There is a big flaw in Helicopter Ben’s analogy. We, the neighbors of this careless person who started a fire, have already paid our taxes to have a fire department. Calling 911 to have the fire put out should not entail any additional expense. In the meantime, my neighbors and I could be hosing down our own houses to prevent them catching fire.

What Mr. Bernanke and the federal government are proposing is that we buy a whole fleet of new fire engines, build a couple of new fire stations, then hire and train new firefighters while our neighborhood goes up in flames.

 But Helicopter Ben has no problem bailing out bad borrowers. The moral hazard does not matter, in his opinion.

He’s also confident he can prevent runaway inflation even though the Fed has dramatically increased the money supply in response to this crisis correction. Why do I not feel even the tiniest bit reassured?

Treasury

zombies_aheadLots of talk in February about nationalization of banks, particularly Citigroup. Even though Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid insists “It’s not nationalization” , Treasury Secretary Tim Geitner gave Citi another $25 Billion of taxpayer money in exchange for “preferred stock”. Timmy paid Citi $3.25 a share for these stocks – the same stocks that are selling on Wall Street for $1.50 a share (Dow closing Feb. 27, 2009). Nice terms if you can get ’em.

But that’s not likely to be the end of it. Citi still faces enormous new losses and investors are not reassured by this latest infusion from the TARP. Citigroup may become the next AIG   (watch for AIG to come begging again in the first days of March).

Mike Shedlock (aka “Mish”) has a good analysis of the Government – Citigroup dealings here.

Treasury also announced that it has provided $429 million to 29 banks in the latest batch of investments under the TARP. Details available here.

Bank of America’s balance sheet doesn’t look good – loans are valued at $44.6 billion less than what its balance sheet says, according to the bank’s annual report released Feb 27 and the losses BofA incurred with their purchase of Merrill Lynch are worse than they thought – about $500 million worse.

Fannie Mae reported a sixth straight quarter of losses – $25.2 billion in Q4 2008.

Fannie Mae (FNM, Fortune 500) had said it would need up to $16 billion to cover its fourth quarter losses. Freddie Mac (FRE, Fortune 500), which has accessed nearly $14 billion and has said it may need up to $35 billion more, should report its results in coming weeks. The companies need the funding because their liabilities exceed their assets, giving them a negative net worth.

Read more

 FDIC

On the last FDIC Friday in February, regulators closed two more banks, bringing the total of failed banks for 2009 to 16.

The good news is that the rate of failures per week seems to have slowed down a bit. The bad news is that the FDIC’s list of troubled banks has grown to its highest level since 1994.

CNNMoney reported that bank failures may cost the FDIC $80 billion. That’s a predicted $65 billion in bank failures between 2009 and 2013 added to the $18 billion cost of 2008 failures.

Stock Market

 February was another losing month for Wall Street. Stocks ended the month at 12-year lows and if you look at the percentages, the decline in stocks has already hit Great Depression levels – a 50+ percent decline from the beginning of the crash.

Also worth noting that it isn’t just the financial stocks that are losing ground anymore. The downward trend is spreading to manufacturers and makers of basic consumer goods.

Finally, to be filed under “a picture is worth a thousand words”, the latest update to the “Four Bad Bears” graph (the grey line is the Great Depression, the blue line is the current recession:

Read the details and view the larger version of the graph here.

Retail

Expect more store closings and layoffs. Reports that came out in February from major retailers show huge 4th quarter losses:

Home Depot reports 4th-quarter loss of $54M

Lowe’s 4Q profit falls 60 percent

J.C. Penney reports 51 percent slide in 4Q profit

Sears 4Q profit falls 55 percent on charges

Macy’s reports 59 percent drop in 4Q profit

Saks Fifth Avenue – $98.75 million 4Q Loss

Gap: Sales & Earnings Down, Stores to Close

Office Depot posts $1.54 billion loss for 4Q

Department stores are unlikely to recover this year. Their primary goal is more likely to be avoiding bankruptcy and having to go out of business completely. On a personal note, I sure hope J.C. Penney survives – it’s one of my favorite stores for affordable, quality merchandise.

Other Economic News

U.S. GDP fell off a cliff in Q4 2008.

The contraction for the fourth quarter of 2008 had been estimated at 3.8 percent just a month ago. Then the Commerce Department raised it to an astonishing 6.2 percent Friday — the largest revision since the government started keeping records in 1976.

Read more

The decline of 6.2 percent is the worst decline since the depths of the 1982 recession.

Consumer confidence fell to a new low in February.

The New York-based Conference Board said its Consumer Confidence Index, which was down slightly in January, plummeted more than 12 points in February to 25, from the revised 37.4 last month. That was well below the 35.5 level that economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters expected.

The index, which had hovered in the high 30s over the past few months, broke new lows since it began in 1967. A year ago, the consumer confidence reading stood at 76.4.

Read more

Even Warren Buffett says the economy will be ‘in shambles’ for 2009.

It’s not just that Americans are losing confidence in the economy, they’re scared about where the nation is headed.

Seventy-three percent of those questioned in a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Monday say they’re very or somewhat scared about the way things are going in the United States. That’s six points higher than in an October poll.

Read more

February Charts from Calculated Risk

Here are a few that stood out for me. See the full report and all the charts at the Calculated Risk blog.

January Employment Report

This graph shows the unemployment rate and the year over year change in employment vs. recessions.

Nonfarm payrolls decreased by 598,00 in January, and the annual revision reduced employment by another 311,000 in 2008. The economy has lost almost 2.5 million jobs over the last 5 months!

The unemployment rate rose to 7.6 percent; the highest level since June 1992.

Year over year employment is now strongly negative (there were 3.5 million fewer Americans employed in Jan 2008 than in Jan 2007).

 

January Retail Sales

This graph shows the year-over-year change in nominal and real retail sales since 1993.

Although the Census Bureau reported that nominal retail sales decreased 10.6% year-over-year (retail and food services decreased 9.7%), real retail sales declined by 10.9% (on a YoY basis). The YoY change decreased slightly from last month.

 

January Capacity Utilization

The Federal Reserve reported that industrial production fell 1.8 percent in January, and output in January was 10.0% below January 2008. The capacity utilization rate for total industry fell to 72.0%, the lowest level since 1983.

The significant decline in capacity utilization suggests less investment in non-residential structures for some time.

 

Vehicle Miles driven in December

This graph shows the annual change in the rolling 12 month average of U.S. vehicles miles driven. Note: the rolling 12 month average is used to remove noise and seasonality.

By this measure, vehicle miles driven are off 3.6% Year-over-year (YoY); the decline in miles driven is worse than during the early ’70s and 1979-1980 oil crisis. As the DOT noted, miles driven in December 2008 were 1.6% less than December 2007, so the YoY change in the rolling average may start to increase.

 

Case Shiller House Prices for December

This graph shows the nominal Composite 10 and Composite 20 indices (the Composite 20 was started in January 2000).

The Composite 10 index is off 28.3% from the peak.

The Composite 20 index is off 27.0% from the peak.

 

Unemployment Claims

This graph shows weekly claims and continued claims since 1971.

The four week moving average is at 639,000 the highest since 1982.

Continued claims are now at 5.11 million – another new record (not adjusted for population) – above the previous all time peak of 4.71 million in 1982.

Wrapping Up

Here’s one bit of good news after all the bad – gold is getting close to $1000 per troy ounce. Silver is also on the rise again.

That’s a lot to absorb for one short month so I’ll close with this a little music.

First, the classic “Sixteen Tons” performed by Tennessee Ernie Ford.

And finally, Jimmy Buffett performing his new song “A Lot To Drink About”

FHA: The New Fannie Mae?

November 22, 2008

FHA: The New Fannie Mae

They’re baaaa-aaack. The same people who engineered a global financial meltdown with bad loans covered by government backing have begun exploiting the Federal Housing Administration in the same manner as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.  Lenders who have bad track records in subprime loans have begun flooding FHA with questionable paper as part of the supposed rescue plan…

Business Week has plenty of examples of this kind of shell game maneuvers in the FHA licensing pool.  We’re heading to yet another collapse through yet another government intervention in the lending market.  Until we stop encouraging the purchase of bad paper in order to achieve social policy, taxpayers will continue to be at risk, and we risk the collapse of Western economies.

Continue reading…

As Ronald Reagan once said, “When you subsidize poverty and failure, you get more of both.”